Reading for pleasure III

HOW PLEASANT IT IS TO HAVE MONEY

As I sat at the café I said to myself, They may talk as they please about what they call pelf, They may sneer as they like about eating and drinking, But help it I cannot, I cannot help thinking, How pleasant it is to have money, heigh ho! How pleasant it is to have money.

I sit at my table en grand seigneur, And when I have done, throw a crust to the poor, Not only the pleasure, one’s self, of good living, But also the pleasure of now and then giving. So pleasant it is to have money, heigh ho! So pleasant it is to have money.

It was but last winter I came up to Town, But already I’m getting a little renown; I make new acquaintance where’er I appear. I am not too shy, and have nothing to fear. So pleasant it is to have money, heigh ho! So pleasant it is to have money.

I drive through the streets, and I care not a damn; The people they stare, and they ask who I am; And if I should chance to run over a cad, I can pay for the damage if ever so bad. So pleasant it is to have money, heigh ho! So pleasant it is to have money.

We stroll to our box and look down on the pit, And if it weren’t low should be tempted to spit; We loll and talk until people look up, And when it’s half over we go out and sup. So pleasant it is to have money, heigh ho! So pleasant it is to have money.

The best of the tables and best of the fare – And as for others, the devil may care; It isn’t our fault if they dare not afford To sup like a prince and be drunk as a lord. So pleasant it is to have money, heigh ho! So pleasant it is to have money.

We sit at our tables and tipple champagne; Ere one bottle goes, comes another again; The waiters they skip and they scuttle about, And the landlords attend us so civilly out. So pleasant it is to have money, heigh ho! So pleasant it is to have money. Arthur Hugh Clough

Clough Arthur Hugh (1819-1861) is remembered as an accomplished, if minor, Victorian poet, whose wise verses had an unusually ironic tone to them. His work reflects the perplexity and religious doubt of mid-19th century England. He worked as a government education official and helped his wife’s first cousin, Florence Nightingale, in her philanthropic work. While on a visit to Italy he contracted malaria and died at age 42.

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Sandra Dezi

Sandra Dezi has a Teaching Degree in English as a Foreign Language, a Bachelor’s Degree in Educational Technology at UTN, a Master’s Degree in Applied Linguistics in the field of TEFL at the European University of the Atlantic and Universidad Iberoamericana, Spain.